The Right-Minded View: The NHS Crisis.

by richardhutton

While it may be true that the NHS currently faces the worst crisis since the last time Conservatives were in government, for reasons which defy any obvious explanation; I say let us not be too hasty with our conclusions.

All that health-treatment does is cure illness; it certainly doesn’t teach people the virtues of self-reliance. Instead of tackling the root cause of broken legs, dependence on medicine teaches the contrary: that it is okay to fall down a flight of stairs, because hospitals will take care of the problem for you.

Rather than spend money on patient care, therefore, I believe that the free-market offers a potential solution here. For instance, why should bacteria have its aspirations inhibited by the red-tape of inoculations, and the like; instead of being free to achieve its ambitions? Let illness and injury compete on a level playing field, I say.

Sure, some people will fall by the wayside, and – to use the emotive idiom favoured by the Left – die; but a bit of fatality never did anyone any harm in the long-run. On the contrary, it represents a success story, in the market of pathogens.

Far worse in my view, however, is the sight of GPs complaining about working a seven-day week. Well, I say it is simply not enough. Nevermind a seven-day week, I used to work a seven-week day; and it never did me any harm.

If doctors are unwilling to take a leaf out of my book, however, then they might at least follow the good example set by our country’s virtuous government ministers – who do so much for the benefit of the land. You never hear them bemoan being overworked or underpaid. That is because they simply have better manners than to do so. Besides, when they are a bit short, they don’t complain; they merely award themselves a pay-rise instead. A better example of conscientious probity I have yet to witness.

And is it really beyond the pale to ask whether we actually need doctors and nurses in the first place? Or to suggest that people who are unwell – perhaps a bit gangrenous in certain parts (don’t ask, don’t tell is the watchword here) – simply take half an aspirin, and find a quiet corner to lie down in; so as not to inconvenience the rest of us? Is there any good reason to invest large sums of money in expensive hospital beds, and pricey wards, when a flattened-cardboard box in the middle of a street serves much the same purpose? I would wager not.

What’s more, British people can be their own medical experts, these days. Not only would it save on the public purse if people eschew visiting surgeries, and seek advice from a local newsagent instead; but it would mean that the £350 million per week, previously pledged to the NHS, could be devoted to a more worthwhile endeavour – like increased subsidies for private providers, operating within the National Health Service.

No, I say steady the course, PM May. This bold policy of creating a doctor-free health service is a marvel for all to behold.

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